International students

In this episode of The Beacon, Zoe Hodge interviews some of Oxford University's many international students and how this reflects global international relations. She discusses race, nationality and intercultural exchange with Layo London, and visiting American students at Mansfield College, Kaitlyn DeVeydt, Brandon Sanchez and Audrey Putnam.

The Trump Podcast

This week's episode of The Beacon explores President Trump's approach to foreign policy. Questioning how far Trump's election represents a turning for US foreign policy, and aiming to get behind the meaning of "America First", Lydie Sheehan speaks to Dr Jacob Parakilas, Assistant Head of the US and Americas Programme at Chatham House, and Dr Charles Krauthammer, a political commentator for the Washington Post and Fox News. 

Counter-terrorism

This week’s podcast focuses on approaches to counterterrorism. To find out more on the matter Lydie Sheehan spoke to Professor Louise Richardson, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford and a specialist in international security with an emphasis on terrorist movements, Dr Loretta Napoleoni, a political analyst with expertise in terrorist financing, and Richard Barrett, former director of global counter-terrorism at MI6, who now works on countering violent extremist as part of the Global Strategy Network.

Revolution in Tunisia

This week, The Beacon examines the 2011 uprisings in Tunisia that jumpstarted the “Arab Spring” across the Middle East and North Africa. To understand what happened in Tunisia from the people’s perspective during those early days, Dunya Habash spoke with 3 Tunisians who participated in the events in different ways. The first was Montasar Adaili, a masters student studying in Tunis when the protests broke out, Dr. Mohamed-Salah Omri, associate professor of Modern Arabic Language and Literature at Oxford’s Oriental Institute, and Yosra Outertani, an associate professor of English at the Higher Institute of Languages of Nabeul, Carthage University. 

 

If you wish to comment on this topic, we are accepting admissions to our blog. Similarly, you may find the original, unedited interview with Dr. Omri below. 

 

The Dr. Omri interview can be found here.

The Curious case of Brazil: should the BRICs drop the B?

This week Zoe Hodge takes a look at Brazil. In the midst of the on-going corruption scandal, and mired in recession, the once-golden country of economic growth and prospering democracy seems now more than a little tainted. We explore the current crisis, and locate it within a longer story of Brazilian history and culture. Interviewing an academic, a journalist and a university student, these Brazilians reflect on the legacy of their country and their thoughts on its future.

Multiculturalism

For the second episode of Hilary Term 2017, The Beacon looks in depth at multiculturalism. Interviewing social anthropologist at Oxford University, Professor Dawn Chatty, as well as Syrian-American Tasneem Karassi and Indian-American Smriti Krishnan, we examine the theory and practice of multiculturalism in today's global society. This includes defining multiculturalism and hearing personal accounts of growing up in a multicultural family.

 

If you wish to comment on this topic, we are accepting admissions to our blog. 

 

Europe: 1989 onwards!

For the first episode of Hilary Term 2017, The Beacon looks at Eastern Europe post-1989. Interviewing political and economic experts at UCL's School of Slavonic and East Europe Studies, Dr. Kubik and Dr. Cvrcek, as well as active campaigner Tomas Bladyniec, we examine the economic and political history, present and future of the region. This includes touching on the recent developments of the rise of far-right governments, particularly in Poland.

 If you wish to comment on this debate, we are accepting admissions to our blog. Similarly, you may find the original, unedited versions of the interviews below. 

The Bladyniec interview can be found here , the Cvrcek interview here and the Kubik interview here.

The International Criminal Court

This week the Beacon is investigating the International Criminal Court. The ICC claims to be the world’s first permanent international criminal court 'participating in a global fight to end impunity.' However in recent months the withdrawal of some African Nations, including South Africa, have led some to question the global agenda of the ICC and instead to suggest that it disproportionately targets the leaders of smaller and weaker states, the majority of which are to be found in Africa. To learn more about the ICC and the veracity of such accusations Rupert Sparling spoke to Dr. Fadi El Abdallah, currently the Spokesperson and Head of the Public Affairs Unit at the International Criminal Court, Muthoni Wanyeki,  an human rights activist and the current Regional Director of Amnesty International in East Africa, and finally Dr Christine Schwobel-Patel, Senior Lecturer in International Law at Liverpool University

The Appointment of the UN Secretary General

One individual to represent 7 billion. Is such a thing even possible? And what conceivable process could be representative enough to measure up to this ideal. This week’s podcast is about the recent appointment of a new United Nations Secretary General. How important is the appointment? What are we to make of the new Secretary General António Guterres? Will he in fact be able to accomplish anything? And why yet again has the UN refused to place a woman in charge? In order to learn more about this topic, Rupert Sparling spoke to Professor Simon Chesterman, Professor of Law at the National University of Singapore, Natalie Samarasinghe the Executive Director of the United Nations Association-UK (UNA-UK) and co-founder of the 1 for 7 Billion Campaign and Ourania Yancopoulos a journalist for Open Democracy and writer on the UN.

Women and Peace Building

 

This week the Beacon is looking at the subject of women and peace-building to explore the relationship or lack of relationship between the two. To learn more about this Rupert Sparling spoke to Professor Anne-Marie Goetz, clinical professor at the Center for Global Affairs and formerly Chief Advisor on Peace and Security at UN Women, Professor Elisabeth Porter at South Australia University and former director of the INCORE institute in Belfast Northern Ireland and Dr. Thania Paffenholz, Director of the Inclusive Peace and Transition Initiative (IPTI) at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva.

Changes in the Media and their Impact on Politics

This week The Beacon explores transformations in the media environment in the past decade and their impact on the political cycle. To learn more about this issue, Rose Vennin spoke to Doctor Rasmus Kleis Nielsen, Director of Research at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism, Colin Byrne, CEO UK&EMEA for Weber Shandwick, a leading global public relations firm, and previously Head of Press for the Labour Party, and Helen Lewis, deputy editor of the New Statesman.

Doctor Nielsen’s full interview is available here, Mr. Byrne full interview is available here, and Mrs. Lewis’ full interview is available here. Our intro and outro music is provided by podcastthemes.com.

Corruption in South Africa

This week the Beacon is looking at the subject of Corruption in South Africa. To learn more about this Daniel Thomson spoke to Andrew Faull, a senior researcher at the Centre of Criminology in the University of Capetown, Gareth Newham, Head of the Governance, Crime and Justice division at the Institute for Security Studies, and David Lewis, a former chairperson of the South African Competition Tribunal, and the Executive Director of Corruption Watch, a platform for reporting and raising awareness of corruption, based in South Africa.

Andrew Faull's full interview is available here, Gareth Newham's full interview is available here, and David Lewis's full interview is available here. Our intro and outro music is provided by podcastthemes.com

Understanding Pakistan

This week the Beacon is looking at the subject of Pakistan, in particular at the country's recent history in relation to the themes of justice, corruption and Islamic extremism. To learn more about this Daniel Thomson spoke to Omar Waraich, an independent journalist and member of Chatham House and the Royal Institute for International Affairs, Owen Bennet-Jones, and independent journalist and author, and presenter of Newshour, and Kamal Alam, a research analyst at RUSI. 

Omar Waraich's full interview is available here, Owen Bennet-Jones' full interview is available here, and Kamal Alam's full interview is available hereOur intro and outro music is provided by podcastthemes.com

A Profile of China's Foreign Policy

This week The Beacon explores what drives China’s foreign policy actions. To learn more about China’s foreign policy goals Haley Lemieux spoke to Dr. Rogier Creemers, a professor at the Oxford China Centre, Mathieu Duchatel, a senior policy fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations, Mortiz Rudolf, a researcher for the Mercator institute for China Studies, and Angela Stanzel, a policy fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations.

Professor Creemer’s full interview is available here, Mr. Duchatel’s full interview is available here, Mr. Rudolf’s full interview is available here, and Ms. Stanzel’s full interview is available here. Our intro and outro music is provided by podcastthemes.com

How does oil affect world politics?

This week The Beacon addresses how oil affects world politics through contributing to authoritarianism and armed conflict. To learn more about the ‘oil curse’ and its implications for international relations Haley Lemieux spoke to Dr. Leif Wenar, author of the new book Blood Oil and professor at Kings College London, Dr. Jeff Colgan, author of the book Petro-aggression: When Oil Causes War and professor at Brown University, and Dr. Michael Ross, author of the book The Oil Curse and professor at UCLA.

Professor Wenar’s full interview is available here, Professor Colgan’s full interview is available here, and Professor Ross’ full interview is available here. Our intro and outro music is provided by podcastthemes.com. The interlude music is Gymnopédie no. 1, available here

Has Latin America Shifted Away from the Left?

This week The Beacon addresses the recent shift in Latin American politics away from the left. To understand recent events in the region, to what extent politics really are shifting away from the left and what possible consequences these changes could have, we weighed in with Andrea Noel, Dr. David Doyle and Robie Mitchell. Andrea is a freelance journalist based in Mexico City and former Latin America editorial coordinator for Vice News, David is a professor of comparative government at the University of Oxford and fellow at the Latin America Centre, and Robie is a former research associate at the Council of Hemispheric Affairs.

 

To read more about this topic you can check out Andrea’s article for Vice News here and Robie’s article for COHA here. Our intro and outro music is provided by podcastthemes.com. The interlude music is Gymnopédie no. 1, available here

US Presidential Primary

This week The Beacon addresses the presidential primary elections in the United States. Although voting doesn’t start until February 1st, we weighed in with Professor Desmond King, and gained student perspectives from Bobby Puckett, Sam Sussman, Brian McGrail, and Varun Menon. Professor Desmond King addresses what distinguishes the U.S. elections from similar elections in the world. Brian, Bobby and Sam shared their thoughts on the democratic nominees, the future of the Democratic Party and the historical context of this election. Finally, Varun gives us an insight into the key issues shaping the campaign. 

Professor King’s full interview is available here, Varun Menon’s full interview is available here. Our intro and outro music is provided by podcastthemes.com. The interlude music is Gymnopédie no. 1, available here

Yiftah Curiel on Israel-Palestine Violence

'The Beacon' is the brand new podcast from Oxford IR Soc. Each week we will be focusing on a pressing topic in the news and interviewing a variety of academics, politicians and journalists to get a range of perspectives. Our focus this week is the recent violence in Israel and the West Bank. On the 24th December Isreali authorities declared three Palestinian assailants were killed as they carried out or tried to carry out stabbing or car-ramming attacks against Israeli security personnel, and a fourth Palestinian was killed in clashes with Israeli troops. Two Israeli security guards and a soldier were wounded. These recent attacks are a perpetuation of a violent trend since mid-September which shows no signs of abating. Since September Palestinian attacks, mostly stabbings and shootings, have killed 20 Israelis, while Israeli fire has killed 124 Palestinians, among them 85 said by Israel to be attackers. The rest were killed in clashes with Israeli forces. Israel accuses The Palestinian Authority of inciting the violence. In response the PA has commented that it is the simply result of nearly 50 years of military occupation. The violence has been triggered in part by recent visits by Jewish groups to the Al-Aqsa Mosque compound in occupied East Jerusalem, coupled with restrictions on Palestinian access to the mosque. Frustration is also mounting as Israel continues to build Jewish-only settlements throughout the West Bank. However, these events also poses a threat to the leadership of the Palestinian authority which now appear trapped in a catch-22 situation over the continuing violence, which they neither lead nor feel able to fully condone or disavow. What are the origins of this spate of attacks? Are the current punitive tactics employed by Israeli security forces the best way of combating them? and what implications do recent events have upon the current viability of the two state solution? To examine these questions in more detail Will Yeldham spoke to Yiftah Curiel Head Spokesperson at the Israeli Embassy. What are your thoughts? Get involved by visiting our website, Facebook page and Twitter feeds and comment to keep the debate going. We will post details of the speakers ahead of the recording and you have any questions you'd like us address please send them in to sir-editor@irsoc.com.

Still Fit For Purpose? The UN at 70

'The Beacon' is the brand new podcast from Oxford IR Soc. Each week we will be focusing on a pressing topic in the news and interviewing a variety of academics, politicians and journalists to get a range of perspectives. Geopolitical alliances, the changing nature of conflict and the concept of humanitarian intervention have all thrown up new issues for the Security Council. Its efficacy has been questioned, particularly in light of their failure to intervene during the Rwandan Genocide and the current Syrian conflict. So, can the Security Council – and the broader UN – remain fit for purpose in light of this rapidly changing world? In this week's podcast Amelia Cooper spoke to Lydia Swart, Consultant at the Centre for UN Reform Education. She has been following the question of UN Security Reform since 2006, before which she worked in various non-profits and UN related organizations. Following that, she spoke to UN Expert Sam Daws, who has worked for or with the UN for over 25 years. He served for three years as First Officer to UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan, and then spent six years as the Executive Director of the UN Association of the UK. He has since worked for the British Government in UN-related roles, and has written profusely about the UN. What are your thoughts? Get involved by visiting our website, Facebook page and Twitter feeds and comment to keep the debate going. We will post details of the speakers ahead of the recording and you have any questions you'd like us address please send them in to sir-editor@irsoc.com.

The Question that Won't Go Away: Britain's Exit from the EU and what it could mean

'The Beacon' is the brand new podcast from Oxford IR Soc. Each week we will be focusing on a pressing topic in the news and interviewing a variety of academics, politicians and journalists to get a range of perspectives. In this week's podcast Will Yeldham speaks to Dr Tim Oliver, Dahrendorf Fellow on Europe-North America Relations at the London School of Economics, also a non-resident fellow at the centre for transatlantic relations John Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies DC. They discuss the regions of support for Britain's renegotiation within the EU and whether a Brexit could prompt a wider disintegration. Next Will spoke to Professor Erik Jones Director of European and Eurasian Studies at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies of the Johns Hopkins University. He is also Senior Research Fellow at Nuffield College in Oxford, United Kingdom. They focused upon the effect of a Brexit upon calls for a new referendum on Scottish independence and the wider impact upon Britain's relation with the US and China What are your thoughts? Get involved by visiting our website, Facebook page and Twitter feeds and comment to keep the debate going. We will post details of the speakers ahead of the recording and you have any questions you'd like us address please send them in to sir-editor@irsoc.com.